Review: Ledgemont Country Club

Course Name: Ledgemont Country Club

Designer: Alfred Tull (1949)

Location: Seekonk, Massachusetts

History: This course opened in 1924 in West Warwick, RI, but moved to its current location in 1949. Despite being in Massachusetts, this course is still a member of the RIGA and has hosted several state tournaments including the Rhode Island Amateur and Rhode Island Open.

Conditions: 8/10, while not in top country club shape, this course has been very nice the times I have played it. Tee boxes are usually pristine as are the speedy greens.

Value: N/A, this is a private golf course.

Scorecard:

Tee                     Par         Yardage         Rating          Slope

Blue                   71           6801               73.4               134

White                71          6492               72.1               131

Red                    74          5846               74.3              130

Yellow              74          5069               69.9              121

Best Score: 86 (White Tees), 7/28/2013 with Dad and his friend

Front 9 Best: 42 (White Tees), 7/28/2013 with Dad and his friend

Back 9 Best: 44 (White Tees), 7/28/2013 with Dad and his friend

Hole Highlights: This course is a challenge, especially from the Blue Tees. With that being said, the course actually begins with several scoreable holes, notably the first hole. At just about 475 yards, this par 5 is reachable in two. A smart player will get the ball in play with an iron and then pretty much guarantee par or better. The second hole also seems to ask for an iron off the tee. Although short, this hole has a challenging green with extreme slope. The third hole is a fantastic hole – a long par 4 with a narrow fairway, this hole actually has two tee boxes on each side of the hole, making it a dogleg right and/or left. I find hole 4 to be an extremely intimidating par 3. At about 200 yards, the green requires a carry over a small pond. This green also drops off on the left side into the water, making right the preferred miss. While short, the fifth hole provides a challenge with its tiny green. Hole 6 is a rather bland par 3 with no real danger, but it is followed by a great downhill par 4. At over 460 yards from the Blue Tees, a creek makes players think twice about hitting their second shots. 8 is another memorable hole. Although another short par 5 on the scorecard, this hole is incredibly uphill, making it play considerably longer. Hole 9 finishes the side with a great approach shot to a well-bunkered green complex.

Like the first hole, the 10th offers you a scoring chance on the back 9 as a medium-length straightforward par 4. Hole 11 is a dramatic hole, and one that I am not particularly fond of. An elevated tee box to a fairway that stops at about 275 yards due to a creek offers a formidable tee shot. If this fairway creek isn’t bad enough, there is another creek at about 400 yards, making the layup shot very difficult as well. 12 is a good downhill par 3, while 13 is an extremely difficult uphill dogleg right par 4. The next three holes are pretty straightforward and unremarkable, but hole 17 is a great hole. Similar to the par 4 7th, this is a long downhill dogleg left with another creek crossing the fairway. I am also a huge fan of the 18th hole. This is one of my favorite tee shots ever, as an elevated tee and wide fairway make swinging for the fences the move. The clubhouse looms in the distance, making the view from the tee box even better.

General Comments: With a large fast putting green and a grass range, the practice facilities on this course are very solid. The clubhouse is picturesque and looks majestic on two approach shots. Pace of play is generally very good on this course, as there are not many members.

Verdict: If you get an invitation to play this course, I highly recommend it. This challenging, well-manicured course is pretty standard for private courses in the area.

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